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SENAHA Eijun

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SENAHA Eijun Professor

Division/Department
Linguistics and Literature / Western Literature
Specialized Field
English and Gender Studies
Research Subject
English literature and film studies, especially on the representations of power relations in sex, gender and sexuality as they include not only women's but masculinities as well as queer studies.
Website
Japanese page
Office/Lab.
Office/Lab.:Furukawa201

E-mail.:june(at)let.hokudai.ac.jp

Replace "(at)" with "@" when sending email.

TEL.:+81-11-706-4085

FAX.:+81-11-706-4085

Lab. Letters: Messages from the Laboratory

Aiming to be a messenger who inspires people: Literary research contributing to a better tomorrow

Literary study is a field that inspires people by objectively conveying to them subjective emotions and questions derived from literary works. In other words, learning how to accurately express yourself as a messenger by bringing “realization” to people around you through literary works—this is the greatest pleasure obtained exclusively from literary study. The “International University Consortium – ProSPER.Net”, which I have chaired, plays the role of a place where members strive to promote Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and to come up with ways of realizing a better tomorrow. I think it’s also about time for us to focus not only on artistic quality through literary research, but also on what we can do about facing real-life problems.

  • Scene from Paradise Lost, the 18th century epic poem written by John Milton Gustave Doré later illustrated it with enchanting imagination.
  • Professor Senaha, known for his development of human resources, exclusively uses a heart-warming red pencil when reviewing theses. He sends promising graduates to corporations, where they please human resources departments as new recruits.

Feel others’ pain as your own. Learn about the beauty of diversity, and bring it back to society.

My research specializes in gender and sexuality. I request that students who wish to conduct literary research contribute to society by developing the attitude of “feeling others’ pain as their own”. I analyze various feelings, such as hope, despair, depression and pain, hidden in the processes of discovering value in diverse ways of life and in paying tribute to them.

The evaluations from my students that have made the deepest impression on me have been the following three comments: “The Senaha seminar was the hardest”…“I worked harder than I ever had”…“I enjoyed it the most.” It’s a great pleasure for me to produce as many students as possible who play an active role in various arenas, while feeling confident in what they learned in my class including skills to gather data so that they can remain undaunted even at academic conferences, as well as those to express themselves so that they can gain the acceptance of corporations.

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